Friday, October 31, 2008

Power chords lesson 2

Hi, This post is also about power chords but power chords that are with Octaves. For more information about power chords, please click on Power chords If you don't know how to make chords, click on Making chords

When we add an Octave, the power chord doesn't have only the 1st and the 5th as per the last post. It also has an 8th, which is also called an Octave.

So, we will be studying some power chords which will have a 1st, 5th and Octave. Here are a few examples:

G5

e------------------
b------------------
g------------------
d--------5----------
a--------5----------
e---3---------------

C5

e------------------
b------------------
g--------5----------
d--------5----------
a---3---------------
e------------------

E5

e------------------
b----------5--------
g--------4----------
d---2---------------
a------------------
e------------------

A5

e----------5--------
b----------5--------
g--2----------------
d------------------
a------------------
e------------------

In the last two examples, you'll have to stretch your hands again however it's worth it. These chords are also movable and you can play them in any position. When you will move these chords to different position, the power chord will change.

For example, when you move the E5 chord one step ahead, it will become F5. As you must be knowing by now one step head means moving to the next fret. Whole step means skipping the next fret and then going on to the next fret. So going from the first fret to the third fret will be considered one whole step.

For some of you, this may not make sense however you can read it again and you can also comment and ask a question. I will be happy to answer your questions. I will also be posting some video lessons soon, so that everyone can get a clearer picture of whatever I am blogging.

There is one more lesson remaining for power chords and I will be posting it in a day or two.

Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Power chords.

Power chords are the backbone of Heavy metal and hard rock music. Anyone who wants to play heavy metal must know these chords. I will post a video of power chords in future. The video will give you a complete explanation of power chords.

Power chords are best used with a distortion pedal and with a technique which is called "palm muting". Palm muting is nothing but keeping the base of your palm near the bridge of your guitar and mildly muting the strings. This has a very good effect when you play the power chords.

Power chords are the chords where there is no 3rd. This means that a power chord is only made of 1st and 5th. An A power chord is written as A5 and a C power chord is written has C5.

So the point is that, if any note has a '5' next to it, it means that its a power chord.

The C power chords will have C and G note.

I will list some of the power chords for you:

C5

e---------------
b---------------
g---------------
d-------5--------
a---3------------
e---------------

D5

e---------------
b---------------
g---------------
d-------7--------
a---5------------
e---------------

F5

e---------------
b---------------
g---------------
d---------------
a-----3----------
e-1--------------

G5

e---------------
b---------------
g---------------
d---------------
a-------5--------
e---3------------


Please note that all these chords are movable. This means, for example, if you move the G5 chords to the next fret, the chord will become a G#5 chord. # indicates a sharp note.

There are two more movable power chord shapes you must familiarize yourself with. In the shape below, the chord starts from a G string, you will have to stretch your hand a bit. The shape is the following:

A5

e---------------
b--------5-------
g--2-------------
d---------------
a---------------
e---------------

Last but not the least, this is also another movable power chord shape:

e-------5--------
b--3-------------
g---------------
d---------------
a---------------
e---------------

Till next time. Cheers.

Monday, October 27, 2008

Suspended chords.

Today, I will be talking about suspended chords. Suspended Chords have a unique sound. The sound is different from a major chord or a minor chord. As we all know that a major chord sounds happy and and minor chord sounds sad.

There are two kinds of suspended chords that we should remember. They are suspended 2nd or suspended 4th. The are also called "sus2" and "sus4".

It would be good for you, if you can remember, these following chord formulas:

Suspended 2nd - 1 2 5
Suspended 4th - 1 4 5

As you will notice from the above formulas, there is no third and it has been substituted by a second or fourth.

Third means the third note of the scale and fourth means fourth note of a given diatonic scale.

The above chords are seen in lot of rock songs. It's also used in the famous Summer of 69 song by Bryan Adams.

I will list the C sus4 and Csus2 chord below:

Csus4

e--1---------------
b--1---------------
g------------------
d------------3-----
a------------3-----
e------------------

The above chord is part of chord progression used in the hit song November Rain By Guns N roses.

C sus2

e-x-----------------
b--1----------------
g------------------
d------------------
a----------3--------
e-x-----------------

x means these strings should not be played.

You can try to figure out other suspended chords by yourself and if you have a question, you are always welcome to post a comment.